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Institute Preamble

All leading profession such as project management, have professional bodies to set standards, guide the member and raise the level of trust and confidence of the public in the profession. All members must express their commitment to the code when they join the profession and to subsequent changes to the code which may be agreed from time to time.

We, the Project Management Professional in Ghana to fully realize our purpose, do hereby adopt and establish the Institute of Project Management Professionals (IPMP) as the Project Management Professional Bodies as the guiding instrument of our profession in Ghana on the preamble below:

The demand for project management professionals and practitioners is increasingly vital to many areas of business today as a result of organizations embarking on complex projects with the view in creating unique products and services. According to Dr. David Ackah, PhD (2016) in his research article “why many projects fail to complete in Africa”, planning projects require Professional Competence Baseline (PCB) in scope, budget, schedule and quality management which he describe as the major projects constraints known as the project trapezium.

6According to Ackah, D., (2016), in Africa, many government projects are not completed on the scheduled project time. This is because of delays which characterize projects in many places, including Ghana. For example, in the construction industry shortcomings like poor understanding of the project, lack of modern equipment, incompetent contractors, inadequate supervision, etc. result in delayed completion of projects, cost overruns and compromised quality.

Due to its several circumstances, including political stability, relatively good governance and fast economic growth trajectory, Ghana is host to several and major development projects and landmark reforms. There is a plethora of on-going and competed projects which provide sufficient evidence of the characteristics that affect the fate of projects.

Many government projects suffer the peril of non-completion. This situation is much pronounced in government roads and bridges projects, hydropower projects, thermal power projects, housing projects, agricultural projects, educational policies & programmes, and directly affects the lives of the people and the government’s development agenda.  The profession of project management is changing rapidly. Organizations have evolved their ability to define and implement new areas of work, with more integration of project management principles and more focus on the long-term benefits.

Project management, then, is established as the preeminent method for making change in organizations and businesses and project, programme and portfolio managers are leading the way. The professionals of tomorrow will work in distributed environments with overlapping and often conflicting stakeholder interests, challenged with too much information and not enough communication and judged by their ability to deliver products or services that align with short and long term strategies, to deliver benefits (Ackah, D., 2016).

According to Ackah, D., (2016), the professionals of tomorrow will work in distributed environments with overlapping and often conflicting stakeholder interests, challenged with too much information and not enough communication and judged by their ability to deliver products or services that align with short and long term strategies, to deliver benefits.

In order to avoid the menace of projects’ non-completion, the root causes should be identified, which should help practitioners to adopt mitigating measures. According to Martin J. Williams (2016), “Using an original database of over 14,000 small development projects in Ghana, I estimate that approximately one-third of projects that start is never completed, consuming nearly one-fifth of all local government capital spending”.

The profession of project management has become a global one. Organisations frequently engage in projects, programmes and portfolios that cross organisational, regional and national borders. The modern manager must work with a wide range of partners outside of his/her organisation and with a broad array of factors including industry, culture, language, socio-economic status and organisation types. Project management has to be applied taking these contextual facets into consideration. Often these broader contexts are seen as the most critical success factors. The IPMP PCB emphasizes these challenges.

It will take IPMP three years to train project, portfolio and programme management professionals in Ghana on the institute’s PCB to equip them with competency-based standards of practice in managing project, portfolio and programmes. With the IPMP PCB, a new standard is available.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 2030 is aim at ending poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all, the practice of project management is becoming critical to the success of many development, government, and nonprofit organizations (NGOs). With reduced budgets and increased demands from donors and other stakeholders, organizations need to incorporate the tools and practices of modern project management in order to achieve the expected results. Embracing and integrating formalized project management within an organization involves more than merely completing a training program.